Taurus 24/7 G2

By Paul Markel - Last updated: Thursday, December 15, 2011 - Save & Share - 9 Comments

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Summary: Paul Markel’s review of and rating for the Taurus 24/7 G2 pistol, including a description, range report, photos, pricing, specs, user ratings and user comments. (Click here to see all of Markel’s handgun reviews.)

Editor’s Handgun Review
Handgun reviews: Left-side view of the 24/7 G2 full-size.

The full-size model with a blue finish.

Despite the predictions of hard-core purists in the early 1990s, the so-called plastic gun fad is far from over. Quite the opposite, as every major handgun manufacturer in the world now has some form of polymer-frame pistol and/or revolver.

Taurus International entered the polymer-frame pistol market with the 24/7 model several years ago. Since that time, it has added a tremendous number of guns to the line and made several modifications to the original design.

The Taurus model 24/7 G2 is the latest version of the pistol. In this review I look at the full-size, 9mm incarnation of this model.

The Details
The Generation 2, or simply G2, is essentially a culmination of the original 24/7 models and the Taurus 800 series. (Here are links to our basic-info pages for the 24/7 Pro and the 24/7 OSS.) It’s chambered in 9mm, .40 SW or .45 ACP, and full-size or compact models are available.

The full-size G2 in 9mm holds a full 17 rounds of ammunition in steel magazines, two of which come with each gun.

Stainless steel or blue steel versions are available. Taurus provides three different backstraps in small, medium and large. The full-size stainless steel barrel measures 4.2″ long, and the gun measures 7.28″ long overall. (The compact’s stats: 3.5″ barrel, 6.6″ long.)

As for the controls, this gun is a lefty’s dream. All of the manual controls are ambidextrous—the magazine release button, slide lock, decocker and manual safety lever.

The 24/7 G2 is a striker-fired gun, and you can get it with either a double-action/single-action (DA/SA) trigger, a DA-only trigger or an SA-only trigger. Other features include:

Each pistol ships in a padded hard case all the accessories mentioned herein.

Range Time
It’s been many years since I tested out the original 24/7 Taurus pistol, so I wanted to give this model a serious workout. For my range testing I picked out five separate loads of 9mm ammunition to include FMJ training ammunition and controlled-expansion defensive rounds. I gathered ammo from Federal’s American Eagle, CorBon, DoubleTap, Hornady, and Wolf.

Step one: Chronograph each load over my Shooting Chrony F1. From the 4.2″ barrel I expected moderate velocities, and I found every load was on par with pistols of similar size:

Next up: bench work. I posted paper targets on a 15 meter stand. During slow, deliberate shooting you truly get to know the trigger of a gun. The first-shot DA trigger press seemed a bit rough, but the SA press was a bit better. From 15 meters, I discovered that six shot groups around 3″ were the norm. Also, rounds were striking 3″–4″ above point of aim but centered for windage. Here are my complete results:

Shooting Drills

The 24/7 G2 is not marketed as match or target gun—it was built for personal defense. With that in mind, I set about running numerous shooting drills with the handgun.

For initial reliability testing, I loaded both magazines full with 17 rounds and topped off the G2 with one in the pipe. The result? The pistol cycled reliably when topped off.

Handgun review photo: Left-side photo of Taurus 24/7 G2 compact.

The compact model with a stainless finish.

I engaged cardboard silhouette targets from a standing two-hand hold. Thirty-five rounds into the practical testing I switched to one-hand shooting. I fired a total of 18 rounds right-hand (dominant) only. After a magazine change, I fired 17 rounds fired left-hand (support) only. The G2 ran without a hiccup.

Next up: moving drills, forward, backward and laterally. These drills test the shooter and their equipment, and during them I truly longed for a more practical set of sights. To be frank, three-dot sights are for amateurs and people who don’t shoot fighting handguns. Excessive white paint, or any other color, distracts the eye and draws attention away from what’s really important, the front sight. Folks, gun-makers put the front sight directly above the muzzle for a reason. The direct correlation between the muzzle (where the bullet exits the gun) and the front sight is critically important. For handgun distances, aligning your dominant eye with the front sight puts the muzzle onto the target with very little or no assistance from the rear sight.

Any color or configuration of the rear sight that distracts from the front sight focus is extraneous and unnecessary. When time is short, such as a fight for your life, the fractions of seconds wasted to ignore a brightly colored rear sight, to differentiate between rear dots and front, or to make the three dots line up perfectly is potentially hazardous.

If you find yourself in a fight for your life with a handgun, you’re already having a bad day. Why would you deliberately complicate matters with a cluttered set of sights? This is particularly true when we consider that most gunfights occur during poor lighting conditions.

Getting Down
I ran a last set of drills from unconventional and awkward positions. It’s an imperfect world and often you’ll have to fight from non-traditional positions. My drills included shooting from a flat prone (belly down), fetal prone (on your side) and supine (on your back). Flat and fetal prone are particularly useful when shooting around low, limited cover. The supine position simulates being knocked on your butt or falling down. No time-outs in gun fights—you must be able to fight from whatever position you find yourself in.

Finally, I practiced engaging targets from kneeling; both knees down, strong knee down and support knee down. You don’t know what kind of cover you might have available, left or right, high or low. It may very well pay big dividends to learn to work from all positions.

Final Thoughts
I’m pleased to report the 24/7 G2 cycled every round I put through it, even though I ran the lion’s share of practice and drills with the less expensive American Eagle and Wolf FMJ loads.

Despite my misgivings about the trigger feel during slow fire, I found it wasn’t much of an issue during the drills. The trigger felt rough, no doubt about it, but like many inexpensive factory guns, I’d say a dedicated break-in period will probably help the components smooth out and mesh together.

Bottom line: Training and practice is the key to running any firing system.


Paul G. Markel became a United States Marine in 1987 and served his nation honorably during peace time and at war. Among the many hats he has worn in his career, Markel has been a police officer, professional bodyguard, firearms instructor and gun writer. Markel is the creative director and host of “Student of the Gun,” a weekly television show airing on the Sportsman Channel (www.studentofthegun.com). Visit his Web site at www.paulmarkel.com.





The Specs

Caliber Capacity BBL OAL Width Height Weight
9mm 10+1, 17+1 3.5″ 6.6″ n/a n/a 27 oz.
9mm 10+1, 17+1 4.2″ 7.28″ n/a n/a 28 oz.
.40 SW 10+1, 15+1 3.5″ 6.6″ n/a n/a 27 oz.
.40 SW 10+1, 15+1 4.2″ 7.28″ n/a n/a 28 oz.
.45 ACP 10+1, 12+1 3.5″ 6.6″ n/a n/a 27 oz.
.45 ACP 10+1, 12+1 4.2″ 7.28″ n/a n/a 28 oz.


MSRP: $498 (full size)
MSRP: $514 (compact)







Posted in $251-$500, .40 SW, .45 ACP, 9mm, Full size, Taurus • Tags: Top Of Page

9 Responses to “Taurus 24/7 G2”

Comment from Chuck S
Time January 22, 2012 at 3:13 pm

Gun is very comfortabel to hold & shoot. Extremely accurate. The only problem I have is that after about 10 or 15 rounds the ramp leading up to the barrel gets “sooty”, (dirty) & I get many fail to feeds.. After a light scrubbing with a Q-tip, everything is fine for another 15 or so rounds. I told Taurus of the problem & they are sending me a new magazine since the one I have wiggles somewhat & has a 1/16th of an inch space at the bottom of the grip. when it clicks into position, they say that this will help. We’ll see.

Comment from Best Handguns
Time February 1, 2012 at 10:20 am

I’ve owned this gun for a while now and I have to say I absolutely love it! Good balance, super light trigger pull and very short reset. It was my first polymer pistol so it took some acclimating but my accuracy improved very quickly. If you’re used to a polymer framed gun this will work for you right out of the box.

Comment from Chad S
Time April 3, 2012 at 1:03 pm

I love this gun, for the price I paid shot for shot this is one of my best guns and is also my new carry gun. I also have the gap issue at the bottom of the mag but it has not hindered the guns proformance at all. I myself have not had a failure to feed but my wife has, and I think that is due to the weaker wrist of my wifes grip. Very Accurate right out of the box, I cleaned it and went straight to the range, put about 300 rounds down range.I have no complaints other than the mag issue but that is only astetic and not a functional issue.

Comment from dboy225
Time May 2, 2012 at 2:02 am

As long as you dont have crap mags you a looking at perfection!

Comment from mike r
Time June 17, 2012 at 10:58 am

im not that happy with this gun i bought the 45 acp compact and ive got about 200 rds through it…..when i first got it i took it home and cleaned the heck out of it to get the packing grease out of it…..went to the range and shot a box of ammo….had atleast one failure to feed every mag i ran through it…trigger was going in and out of single action and double action every other round…took it home cleaned the heck out of it again…..200 rds in its still doing the above mentioned and also throwing brass right in my face probably every 6th shot….and the mag release in my opinion is terrible…you have to push it way to hard so a hasty mag change is out of the question……guess its time to deal with taurus’s cust service which i dread cause ive heard very bad things about them!!!!…hopefully it all works out

Comment from nonoy hinola
Time August 16, 2012 at 8:17 am

I have a G2 24/7 40 acp. tried 200 rounds of ball type ammo at the range, No fail….Everything is still hard because it’s brand new but I was surprise for the first 200 rounds, no jam….For the price I bought, this is a good handgun…My only negative comment is the magazine….It rattles when you insert it to the gun. It has a play, other than that, it’s a good gun for the price you get.

Comment from Justin Jay
Time March 25, 2013 at 2:01 pm

Taurus 24/7 G2 .45 acp full size. Great gun out of the box. After clean the G2 I put it to the test and fresh out of the box it was dead on. I loved it not a hick up one I used old rounds new rounds reload, steel round with no problems.this is my first Taurus hand gun. I’ve heard a lot stuff about there hand guns so I wouldn’t buy one.I would buy glocks,s&w and so on. The Taurus put my glock and s&w to same. I loved the DASA on the Taurus it took some time to get used to and the trig was about 6 lbs but started to loosen up .so all in all Great gun in my book and for the price I will buy more Justin

Comment from Caligula
Time October 21, 2013 at 11:48 pm

Taurus handguns are like a box of chocolates, you never know if you’re going to end up with a lemon. I’d rather spend another $100 for a Glock, Beretta, Ruger, etc. Why go cheap on a tool meant to defend you and your loved one’s lives?

Comment from Joby B
Time March 15, 2014 at 4:16 pm

Just got a new 24/7 g2 9mm compact a few weeks ago. First 150 rounds or so had a few failure to feed issues. Went back home and gave it a real good cleaning and polished the feed ramp. After that I changed up ammo and have had no problems sense. I really like this gun and have a use full size and never had any issues.

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