Tag Archives: Handgun Roundups

This page shows excerpts from and links to every handgun roundup article posted on GunsGunsGuns.net.

Handgun Roundup: the Glock 19 Killers?

By - Last updated: Monday, October 2, 2017
Glock 19 dimensions sketch

The Glock 19’s dimensions place it in the center of the compact camp.

Over the years, I’ve spent a lot of time in gun-related forums, and I don’t know how many times I’ve seen a new-to-guns person post something along the lines of, “I’m looking to buy my first self-defense pistol, any advice?” Invariably, someone will respond, “Glock 19.” Sometimes with no explanation, just make and model.

Brevity aside, it’s a standard answer because when it comes to utilitarian, do-it-all self-defense pistols, the 19 arguably is the standard. It’s chambered in 9mm, an adequate self-defense round that doesn’t kick excessively. Its compact, shortened grip improves concealability but still offers a hefty 15+1 rounds of capacity. Its shortened barrel also improves concealability while delivering acceptable velocity and accuracy. Its polymer frame makes it light to ease carry, but not so light that recoil becomes an issue. With a striker-fired trigger system and no manual safety, it’s simple to operate. It’s not expensive, relatively speaking. And probably most importantly, it’s stone-dead reliable.

Since Glock first blitzed the shooting world with its polymer pistols in the 1980s, numerous gun manufacturers have stepped into the arena with their own polymer pistols in a wide range of sizes and varying features. If a new model hews closely to the basic Glock design, it’s sometimes hyped as a “Glock killer,” much as some new smartphones aspire to be iPhone killers.

Glock 19 Killers spreadsheet screenshot

This spreadsheet lists all the below Glock 19-esque guns, and each gun’s user rating and specs.

In 1988, Glock introduced the model 19, and since then a several manufacturers have developed pistols that match up well with the 19’s form factor. Are any of them actually better than the Glock 19? I’m not sure, but I think it’s interesting to check them all out side-by-side.

To that end, this article pulls together info on the six polymer pistols currently in production that closely match the Glock 19’s specs. That means the only guns making it in measure roughly 5″ tall and 7.28″ long, with barrels measuring approximately 4″ long. And of course the other parameters must match up, too—caliber, capacity, firing mechanism, etc. Continue reading

Handgun Roundup: the Full-Size Beretta 92s

By - Last updated: Thursday, April 6, 2017
fullsize Beretta 92 pistols group picture

You can find full-size, Beretta 92-style pistols in numerous configurations.

If imitation truly is the sincerest form of flattery, certain pistols have received high-praise indeed. The Colt 1911-style pistol, for instance, remains wildly popular more than 100 years after its birth with more than 50 manufacturers producing hundreds of different 1911-style pistols. At least 11 manufacturers have produced CZ 75-style pistols in just the past five years or so.

Beretta’s 92-style pistol belongs to this club. In recent years, at least five manufacturers have produced 92-style pistols in roughly 33 different models ranging from Beretta-produced originals to outright clones to compacts to high-end, limited-edition collector guns. Other manufacturers have built 92-style pistols in the more distant past.

This article pulls together info on the 21 full-size 92-style pistols in production within the past five years or so. This list excludes any mid-size, compact and extended-length guns; generally speaking, that means only guns measuring approximately 8.25″-8.7″ long made it in.

Each pistol’s listing is an excerpt from its main info page, which contains a full description, specs, more photos, pricing info and sometimes links to external articles and reviews. To go to that page, click on the gun’s name or photo. To see all the 92-style pistols produced by one of the companies below, visit its category page on our site. Continue reading

Handgun Roundup: the Full-Size CZ 75s

By - Last updated: Thursday, October 20, 2016
The Full Size CZ 75s Group Photo

You can find full-size, CZ 75-style pistols in numerous configurations.

The CZ 75 is probably the second-most copied and/or sourced handgun in history behind only the Colt 1911 pistol. At least 11 manufacturers have produced CZ 75-style pistols in the past five years or so, in roughly 60 different models ranging from CZ-produced originals to outright clones to compacts built on polymer frames. And many more manufacturers have built CZ 75-style pistols in the more distant past.

This article pulls together info on the 40 full-size CZ 75-style pistols in production within the past five years or so. This list excludes any mid-size, compact, subcompact and extended-length guns; generally speaking, that means only guns measuring approximately 8.0″-8.5″ long made it in (although technically the CZ 75 Shadow series includes a long-slide version).

Each pistol’s listing is an excerpt from its main-info page, which contains a full description, specs, more photos, pricing info and sometimes links to external articles and reviews. To go to that page, click on the gun’s name or photo. To see all the CZ 75-style pistols produced by one of the companies below, visit its category page on our site. Continue reading

Handgun Roundup: The Budget 1911s

By - Last updated: Thursday, May 26, 2016

budget 1911 pistols group photo
The 1911-style pistol remains wildly popular more than 100 years after its birth. At last count, roughly 50 manufacturers are producing hundreds of different 1911 models ranging from mil-spec, GI-type versions that recall John Browning’s original design, to uber-refined and customized 1911s that cost thousands of dollars.

This article pulls together info on the 15 least-expensive full-size 1911s in production today into one place. To make this list, a pistol must cost $500 max in actual retail pricing (not MSRP, which is almost always inflated).

Each pistol’s listing is an excerpt from its main-info page, which contains the full description, specs, more photos, pricing info (when available) and links to external articles and reviews. To go to that page, click on the gun’s name or photo.

Note: The listings below include only the cheapest model offered by each company. Many of these companies also offer other 1911 models with enhanced features, different finishes, shortened barrels and shortened grips, and in many cases the prices of these models are also relatively low. To see all the 1911s produced by one of the companies below, visit its category page on our site. Continue reading

Handgun Roundup: the 9mm Pocketguns

By - Last updated: Tuesday, October 7, 2014

This article pulls info for all semiauto 9mm pocketguns into one place. To make the cut, each pistol had to measure no more than 5.75″ long and 4.3″ tall.

I came up with 13 guns by 10 manufacturers. Each pistol’s listing (below) is an excerpt from its main info page, which contains the gun’s full description, specs, pricing info and, when available, more photos, user ratings and user comments. To go to that page, simply click on the gun’s name, which is in blue-colored text. Continue reading

Handgun Roundup: 1911s Chambered in .22 LR

By - Last updated: Wednesday, August 28, 2013

At last count, roughly 25 manufacturers are producing nearly 400 different 1911 models. They are available in a wide variety of calibers, including .45 ACP, 9mm, .38 Super, .40 SW and even .357 Magnum.

Oh, and one really small cartridge: .22 LR.

Why build the combat-oriented 1911 in diminutive .22 LR? Cost, for one thing. .22 LR ammo costs much less than .45 ACP ammo, so shooters can send a lot of them downrange without breaking the bank. Thus a .22 LR 1911 can provide plinking fun, and you can also use one as a wallet-friendly training gun. Finally, .22 LR produces very little recoil, so young shooters can enjoy and learn on a .22-caliber 1911 more easily than they can a big-bore 1911.

This article pulls together info on the nine .22 LR 1911s in production today into one place. (Update 8/28/13: These listings now include Chiappa’s new compact model.) Each pistol’s listing is an excerpt from its main-info page, which contains the full description, specs, more photos, pricing info, user ratings, editor ratings (when available) and links to online stores selling the pistol. To go to that pistol’s page, click on the link included in the excerpt (i.e., the word “here” in blue text). (Note: These listings feature complete guns and don’t touch on .22 LR conversion kits, of which a number exist.) Continue reading

Handgun Roundup: the .380 Pocketguns

By - Last updated: Tuesday, August 20, 2013

pocketgunlineart2In recent years, pocketguns have surged in popularity. Numerous manufacturers now offer tiny handguns you can literally fit into a pocket, in a wide variety of calibers, actions, finishes, etc.

This article pulls info for all semiauto .380 ACP pocketguns into one place. To make the cut, each pistol had to measure no more than 5.6″ long and 4″ tall.

I came up with 32 guns by 19 manufacturers. Each pistol’s listing (below) is an excerpt from its main info page, which contains the gun’s full description, specs, pricing info and, when available, more photos, user ratings and user comments. To go to that page, simply click on the gun’s name, which is in blue-colored text. Continue reading

Handgun Roundup: The Semiauto Magnums

By - Last updated: Tuesday, August 2, 2011

Charles Bronson deployed a Wildey in Death Wish 3. © MCMLXXXV Cannon Productions N.V.

In America, many of us gravitate toward the biggest, the baddest, the fastest. Hence the Corvette, Pamela Anderson, 60-inch TVs, Wild Turkey, Mike Tyson, the Kingda Ka roller coaster and the Super Bowl.

This inclination has its adherents in the handgun world, too. Pistol power has been ratcheting up for, well, forever, and it’s due to demand. Remember when the .44 Magnum was the most powerful handgun in the world? That was a long time and many new cartridges ago. Modern behemoths include rounds such as the .500 SW Magnum, the .454 Casull and many others.

Most magnum-capable handguns are revolvers. Why? It’s proven difficult to construct a practical, functional, usable, magnum-caliber semiauto. Typically, semiautos hold the ammo inside the grip (there are exceptions, such as the Tec-22, Ruger Charger, etc.), and because magnum rounds are big, they require a big grip. Too big for some shooters to feel comfortable with, it turns out.

That’s not to say semiauto magnums don’t exist. Over the years, at least seven models have gone into production chambered for heavyweight rounds such as the .357 Magnum, .44 Magnum, .44 AMP, .45 Winchester Magnum and several others.

A number of these semiauto magnums have entered popular culture. Quick, what was that big semiauto Dirty Harry broke out in the movie “Sudden Impact?” The Auto Mag, of course. Charles Bronson shot bad guys with a Wildey in “Death Wish 3” (pictured at right), and the Desert Eagle has appeared in countless action films.

Of the seven pistols listed below, five appear to be out of production (the Auto Mag, the AutoMags, the Grizzly and the Wildey). You can still find used specimens for sale in gun shops and on online sites such as GunBroker.com. The Desert Eagle and Coonan are both still in production (at press time).

This article pulls basic info for the semiauto magnums into one place. Each pistol’s listing is an excerpt from its main-info page, which contains the full description, specs, more photos, pricing info (when available) and links to external articles and reviews. To go to that page, Continue reading

Handgun Roundup: The .410 Shotshell Revolvers

By - Last updated: Thursday, June 9, 2011

Handguns chambered for .410-caliber shotshells have cultivated a growing fan base recently, particularly since heavyweight manufacturers Smith & Wesson (S&W) and Taurus introduced new .410-capable revolvers this year. It appears there’s just something about a pistol-sized shotgun that draws peoples’ interest.

S&W and Taurus aren’t the only players in this market, of course, and neither is the revolver—the venerable over/under, two-shot derringer has long been in on the .410 action. As far as I can tell, currently seven manufacturers produce handguns chambered for .410-caliber shotshells.

This article pulls all the basic info for .410-caliber revolvers into one place. (To see a list of .410-caliber derringers, click here.) Each pistol’s listing is an excerpt from its main-info page, which contains the manufacturer’s description, specs and more photos, and links to online stores selling that pistol. To go to that page, simply click on the gun’s name, which is in blue-colored text. Continue reading

Handgun Roundup: 1911 Anniversary Models

By - Last updated: Tuesday, April 5, 2011

John M. Browning. PHOTO COURTESY JOHN M. BROWNING FIREARMS MUSEUM

This year marks the 100th anniversary of the 1911 pistol designed by John Browning and originally produced for the U.S. military. The 1911 is wildly popular today, with (at press time) 289 models under production by 25 manufacturers.

Many of these manufacturers offer centennial-edition 1911s to commemorate the 100th anniversary. The design of these pistols range widely, as do the prices. This article provides summary information for each anniversary model currently available, with a link to a page for each gun that features more extensive information and photos. I’ve listed the pistols according to price, from lowest to highest.

Note: If I’ve failed to include a model, please let me know via the Contact form at this link, or via the Comment form at the bottom of this article. And if you’d like a closer look at a gun, click on a photo to enlarge it.

With no further ado, here they are: Continue reading